During Valentine’s Day weekend, the film adaptation of “50 Shades of Grey” made a record breaking $81.7 million. The popularity of the movie and the books has opened the opportunity for conversations about Bondage, Discipline and Sadomasochism, BDSM, fetishes and kink.

The Center for Gender Equity, CGE, is starting this conversation by bringing in a sex psychotherapist from Portland, named Galen Fous.

Fous is a regular columnist with the Good Men Project, has been featured on Playboy’s Radio Sexperts series, featured in Raw Attraction Magazine and many others.

Fous will be the speaker for the event “50 Shades of Fetish” hosted by CGE, it will take place at 7 p.m. on Feb. 24 in Marsh Hall Auditorium.

During his presentation, Fous will be speaking about the stigmas attached to “fetish sexuals,” how society handles those individuals and how there needs to be an increase in understanding and acceptance of all of the different kinds of kinks and fetishes.

Originally CGE wanted to have Fous be a part of a Brown Bag discussion, but with the release of 50 Shades of Grey, it was changed so that he could give an entire presentation.

“We wanted to bring him to the panel to discuss the educational side of BDSM and fetishes and it turns out he does tons of research on the subject,” said CGE Co-Chair, Noelle Hall. “We thought it would be better to have him come as a speaker.”

Fous stated in his blog that even though he has not read “50 Shades of Grey,” the general consensus is that “the depictions of BDSM in the relationship context and the taboo sexual context (BDSM) are generally unsafe, abusive, non-consenual, immature and unconscious interactions between the partners.”

As popular and as far- reaching as the book series have become, it is important to the CGE staff that students and the Pacific community have access to information and education regarding safe practice of BDSM and fetishes.

“The idea of being able to talk about fetishes sounds pretty titillating,” said CGE Director Martha Rampton. “But we really want people to understand that it is a serious subject and we want people to walk away with an feeling of sexual empowerment and wellness.”

By bringing in people to discuss and educate, there is a hope that more people will be able to not only practice and explore in their sexuality in a safe and respectful way, but that they will be able to start and continue the conversation about fetishes, said Rampton.

“A lot of people have fetishes and there is a lot of shame and a certain amount of embarrassment that goes along with that,” said Rampton. “Particularly in the past it seems odd or freakish in the past and news and media has worked to try and normalize that, I think that the fetish thing is the same thing; people shouldn’t be stigmatised for their choices or things like that. It’s about respect.”

By bringing in Fous to Pacific, CGE hopes to continue in their mission of creating an environment where people are comfortable and they are accepting of diversity.

“It’s so hard with movies because Hollywood tends to skew things and make things totally different than how they actually are, same with some books,” said senior, Hall. “We are hoping that he will make it educational and will inform people about what it is and how to do it safely.”

Since February is the month of love, hopefully it will be a well-educated and safe one.

“I just don’t want people to see it as another program about kinky sex,” said Rampton. “I want them to learn something.”

Sponsored

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *