Athletes are not only players of the game, they are also supporters themselves. Not only showing support amongst their own teammates, Pacific athletes also branch out and attend other sporting events.

“I personally try and attend as many other sporting events as I can,” said one of the swim captains, senior Alex Bing. “It’s hard during winter though because I’m involved with swim but I still make what I can.”

Athletes support other athletes for various reasons.

“I enjoy the competition itself, whether I’m playing or supporting, and seeing other Pacific athletes competing in a wide variety of sports,” said baseball player and former football player, Kyle Treadway.

“They come support me,” said soccer player, Kayla Davidson. “By me supporting other athletes is a way to thank them for supporting me at my games.”

The infamous body-painting Boxers set the tone for both athletes and non-athletes at Pacific. Wrestlers Eric Harder, Allin Franco, Shawn Speer, and Lucas Beltz show their support by painting their bodies from head to toe in black red and white for various sporting events, especially football.

“It’s fun not only supporting but also rallying up the crowd,” said Harder.

“It’s less about liking a specific sport,” said Speer. “But rather about showing up and showing your Boxer pride and supporting fellow Pacific students.” They even participate with the cheerleaders and do the touchdown push-ups.

“When everyone else gives up they look for the wrestlers to finish the push-ups,” said Beltz.

“Being an athlete myself, it’s important to show up to other sporting events,” said Franco. “By supporting, it shows respect from one team to another.”

While searching the crowds at a specific game, match or meet, isn’t a top priority, athletes do pay attention to the fan turnout.

“I can easily spot out and hear the baseball and football team,” said soccer player Kamryn Plechot. “It makes it more enjoyable to see when groups of teams come out because we definitely try to go as a team to other sports events.”

“You don’t have to look in the stands to see if anyone, or who in particular, showed up,” said Davidson. “You can hear the difference because crowds at soccer games get so rowdy and exciting.”

While there is in general a great turnout of supporters, there’s always room for improvement.

“If sporting events were more publically announced like a bulletin board or TV in the U.C., it would be helpful for those who don’t go to the SAC often,” said Harder.

Weather plays a big role on the crowd turnout for outdoor sports. “It’s better all-around when the sun’s out for a baseball game,” said Treadway. “There’s more fans that show up and when there’s more fans we tend to play better, the crowd motivates us to play our best.”

“We do have those dedicated fans that show up to our games when it’s pouring rain,” said senior baseball player, Therone Bridges. “We really appreciate everyone who shows up and supports us.”

Fans aren’t just showing support to have a good time in the crowd, they also reflect upon the athletes as well.

“It’s definitely encouraging seeing supports at swim meets,” said Bing. “I know I personally swim faster when I’m being cheered on and I know my teammates feel that way too.”

“I love seeing other athletes and non-athletes show up at games, we definitely beg other students to come out to support us,” said Plechot. “It helps us by motivating us to be better. We owe our success to the fans and supporters.”

“It’s a feeling of excitement and gives us a personal drive when competing, it’s an incentive from outside forces because you can only go so far internally,” said Treadway.

“For me personally, it’s a great feeling when I see supporters because for wrestling, it’s one-on-one so you know when the crowd cheers it’s for you and all eyes are on you,” said Beltz.

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