Campus Housing urges students to think of their next move

Michael Arakawa

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As Pacific University’s spring semester reaches the halfway point, students are starting to make plans about where they want to live next year. While many students have decided to stay on campus, many have also chosen to seek residency outside of campus.

According to Housing Assistant Keagan Weis, students who want to live off of campus will have more personal freedom from the restrictions of on-campus living such as limited kitchen space. They will also gain more individual control over their own rent management and exactly where they want to live.

“Some students looking for off-campus housing may want to make a more a adult decision to find their own apartment or rental space,” Weis said.

A booklet by the Oregon Legal Services states that college students looking for off-campus residency should consider if the place fits their needs, if the student can afford the rent, if they have a plan for paying for electricity, heating, and garbage pick-up as well as inspecting the place of residency for problems before renting.

Pacific students are able to live off campus if they are 20 years old or older by the first day of the fall term or have lived and boarded on-campus for two years.

Students may be able to avoid needing to fulfill these requirements if they fill out a Residency Waiver Request, which is used when students have specific circumstances for desiring to break their housing contract. Circumstances for Residency Waiver Request may include if a student is living with an immediate family member 20 miles from Pacific University, is married, or they have a child.

Current students can obtain a Residency Waiver Request from the housing office. Newly enrolled students who want an exemption from their housing contract for the upcoming year can request a Residency Waiver Request from through the Housing Application online.

Weis insists whether or not a student chooses to live off-campus, they should consider the pros and cons of their available choices. Weis also notes that students should think about how the place they want to live could affect their physical or mental health.

“Beyond just living arrangements, students need to also consider themselves as well,” Weis said.

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